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Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Dec 10, 2012 12:00am EST
better than that. this is one-fifth of the u.s. economy and competition seems to be wrong level and patients frustrated. the other reason i wrote the book is doctors are getting crushed right now. they have declining medicare payments, they've got increasing overhead. hospitals have more expenses. now practice rates are going up. the burnout rate in healthcare is 46%. doctors are getting crushed and i felt like we needed a voice and it's okay to talk to the general public. >> host: you make the point that medical mistakes are the third leading cause of death in the united states. that's a shocking figure. can you talk about that? cincinnati was shocking even for me as somebody interested in this field of quality to see it put in that way. medical mistakes, number three. we kill as many people from medical mistakes as we do from car accidents and other -- three, four and five causes of death in the u.s. i guess i never really thought of it that way 'we don't really talk as openly and honestly about mistakes as we should in our profession, to be very clear. you think about, number one
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 12:00pm EST
and more recent failures of military leaders in bleeding pallette, how the u.s. military mismanage is great leaders and why it is time for revolution. in freedom national, the destruction of slavery in the united states 1861-1855, james oakes, history professor at city university of new york argues that slavery was the foremost reason for the civil war. walter bender, charles cain, jody corners, and neil donahue who all contributed to creating the company one laptop per child was that a company history and provided an outline for other social of japan yours in learning to change the world, the social impact of one lap top per child. in napoleon, left a legacy, and
CSPAN
Dec 31, 2012 12:00am EST
u.s. policy tornado the soviet union is going to change in april of 1945. by the time there's that big meeting on april 23rd with molotov and april 23rd, the united states changed course, and so at that meeting, truman meets molotov -- first meet with advisers and they're divided. marshall, leahy, are all telling him don't break with the soviets. said to the secretary of war and said, the soviets have a much better understand of their open security, especially around poland, than we do. >> stepping back from the details, do you think it was realistic for these two powerful nations, continental powers, each of whom had, i think, it's fair to say, an empire, one formal, one a little more informal, because the soviets had different, smaller states under their control, and going to keep control of the baltic states and moving into eastern europe. was it realistic for these two powers, who are very different, to really get along for very long or were they really destined to have a cold war and luckily never really had a hot war except through proxies. so details are important, and who knows
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 10:00pm EST
series. in it they argue that u.s. leaders must chart a course for the future by first facing what they call the country's troubling history of drifting further away from its democratic traditions. >> host: hello peter and oliver. i've taught with peter at american university. let me start by having both of you talk about the theme of this and how you wrote it? >> guest: i was invited in 1996 to go to this class at american university researching oliver storms america and one of the classes i was very popular. i went very impressed with it and the range of students and afterwards peter suggested that there was a great story about the atomic him in the atomic bomb always fascinated me because i was born the year after it was dropped and it was in new york city, the center of the world and my father was republican and a conservative. he served in world war ii as eisenhower said the bomb was the umbrella, the mushroom under which it grew and anything we did was in the shadow of that. so i was curious about it and the bomb story really does have another origin. the book about the scien
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 12:00am EST
. they mention it briefly in a ruling in 1876. that was u.s. versus cookshank, which arose out of a horrible massacre. one of the worst in the reconstruction period, where a whole -- hundreds or more, blacks, had tried to defend themselves in louisiana, and were attacked by a white crowd, and the federal government attempted to prosecute the attackers. on the grounds they had deprived the blacks who were killed of their right -- >> amend. >> guest: -- the supreme court didn't find that was the case. it said at that time we don't see there was any racial motivation at all here to deprive blacks of their rights specifically, and in a kind of aside, the ruling said that the right to keep and bear arms in the second amendment was not a right granted by the constitution. it was a preexisting right. and so if there was any application, courts alert extended from that to say if it was depriving anybody, it was the federal government. so i was a limitation on the federal government. >> host: that's how most of the bill of rights is interpreted by the courts. only applied the federal governm
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 12:00pm EST
u.s. versus cruickshank, which rose out of the horrible massacre, one of the worst in the reconstruction. , with the whole war, blacks had tried to defend themselves in louisiana and were attacked by white crowds and the federal government attempted to prosecute the attackers on the grounds that they had deprived the blacks who were killed -- >> host: mna type issue. >> guest: didn't find that was the case. at that time we don't see any racial motivation at all to deprive blacks of their very specifically. in a kind of a side, the ruling said that the right to keep and bear arms in the second amendment was not a right granted by the constitution. it was a preexisting right. so if there is any application that courts later extended that if it applied to anybody, who is the federal government. so it's a limitation on federal governments to tell certain classes. >> host: that's how most of the bill of rights is interpreted. but it only applied to the federal government unless specifically incorporated to the states. >> we didn't get on the second amendment until 2010 follow-u
CSPAN
Dec 15, 2012 10:00pm EST
talks about essays from anti-bullying and stopping the epidemic of bullying in the u.s.. >> host: i am so delighted to be here today with cynthia lowen, the producer of the widely acclaimed and really important new documentary, "bully" and the coeditor of the book of the same title. both of which, as our nation's 30 little secret about bullying in schools across america. both the movie and the book put a human face on what it's about, how it impacts kids, on both sides and on the sideline, and their families. so thank you so much cynthia for being here today. why don't we start with you telling us a little bit about yourself? how did you get here? how did you get drawn to the issue? y. here, why now? >> guest: i come from a background as a writer and when i was in middle school, i was one of those kids who was really shy. i think i try to sail under the radar and i was someone who -- and i didn't know what to do about it. all of us i think in this country were starting to see people coming out in talking about their experience with this phenomenon that so many of us had have experience
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 9:00pm EST
they cannot be trusted. they've broken the overall agreement, so the u.s. policy towards the soviet union is going to change in april of 1945. by the time there's a big meeting on april 23rd on april april 23rd the united states had changed course so at that meeting first teammates with his advisers one-fifth within marshall, leahy telling him they are grateful to the soviets and since the secretary of war understood the soviets have a much better understanding to their own security especially around poland than we do. >> stepping back from those details, do you think that it was realistic for these two powerful nations, continental powers, each to ochre and had i think was fair to say the entire one for all because the soviets obviously have their own different smaller states under the control and fifth. whether the two powers were in there is the logical bases to get along for very long. of course it never would have happened, but arguably stabenow as you know himself who is the head of the communist party told the communists and 45 get ready for the class war to continue in effec
CSPAN
Dec 8, 2012 10:00pm EST
. this is one fits almost of the u.s. economy and competition just seems to be at the wrong level and patients are frustrated. another reason i wrote the book is that doctors are getting crushed right now. they have got declining medicare payments. they have got increasing overhead, hospitals have more expenses. malpractice rates are going up. the burnout rate is 46% and doctors are getting crushed right now and i just felt like we needed a voice out there and it's okay to talk to the general public. >> host: so you make the point that medical mistakes for the third leading cause of death in the united states. that is a shocking figure. can you talk a little bit about that? >> guest: it was shocking even for me as someone interested in the skill and quality to put it in that way. medical mistakes. we kill as many people from medical mistakes as we do from car accidents and other three, four and five causes in the u.s.. i guess i've never really thought of it that way because we don't really talk as openly and honestly about mistakes as we showed in our profession, to be very blunt. th
CSPAN
Dec 16, 2012 9:00pm EST
how to stop the epidemic of bullying in the u.s.. .. >> i didn't know what to do about it. all of us in this country are starting to see people coming out and talking about the experience of this phenomenon that so many of us have experienced in one way or another and had i have no words for it, other than adolescence. other than going out. finally, people were starting to stand back and say that this is not actually a normal part of growing up. this is not a normal rite of passage. i think there was a moment where there is a possibility for change. the director, lee hirsch and i started talking about this. voices started bubbling up to the service. this is not something we can expect from a normal culture. in april of 2009, it was right after to young people took their lives. both of those tragedies, i think really ignited a national recognition of what was going on for so long. and we were seeing parents writing into message boards. we were seeing every news story that. hundreds of comments from parents saying that my child is going through this. kids thing that i'm going throug
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)